Category Archives: science

Richard Meyer Natural Gas Market Indicators: Dec. 31, 2013

The newest estimation of the natural gas supply/demand balance from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) recorded in the 2014 AEO Outlook Early Release is a mixture of many interesting observations, modeled results and assumptions. In some cases, the view is more optimistic than it was in 2013. Noting many evolving market conditions, for example, EIA envisions strong and earlier than previously expected total LNG and pipeline natural gas exports. This is supported by a domestic production picture that grows more than 50 percent from 2012 to 2040 on the back of unconventional resource development.

Demographic changes are influencing model results as well. For example, EIA sees a reduction in the growth of vehicle miles traveled due primarily to an aging population. Couple this observation with increases in fuel economy for light duty vehicles and the recipe makes for a reduction in energy consumed in the personal vehicle market from about 16 quadrillion Btus in 2012 to 12.1 quads in 2040.

Visit this link to download the full Natural Gas Market Indicators report. Topics covered in this week’s report include: Reported Prices, Weather, Working Gas in Underground Storage, Natural Gas Production, Shale Gas, Rig Counts, Pipeline Imports and Exports, and LNG Markets.

Reader Notice

AGA is very grateful for the reader interest in our Natural Gas Market Indicators report, which is now marking the 218th issue published. Although we will continue to circulate the document twice per month via e-mail, a new look is in the works and new tools for you to forward the report to others are being developed. Please be on the lookout for initial changes in the format beginning January 2014. Our content and purpose will remain the same, which is to provide you a snapshot of critical natural gas industry developments from a local gas utility perspective. Thank you again for your interest in our market views and your readership.

Please direct questions and comments to Chris McGill at cmcgill@aga.org or Richard Meyer at rmeyer@aga.org.

Posted in energy, environment, Natural Gas, science, technology, weather, winter heating | Comments Off

Chris McGill Natural Gas Market Indicators: Aug. 15, 2013

Temperatures across the nation have cooled during the past three weeks, pulling down the warmer than normal conditions for the summer to 9.4 percent more cooling degree days – warmer than normal – since the first week of May. Regionally, the Pacific (31.9 percent warmer) and New England (54.7 percent warmer) regions have been warmest compared to normal, with the Middle Atlantic and Mountain regions also very warm. The center of the country has experienced, cumulatively, much more near normal conditions for the summer season to date.

With that said, hurricane activity this year in the Atlantic basin has been relatively calm though more activity is expected. Hurricane season normally gets more serious during August and September, but influences on domestic supply and prices (even short term impacts) have been muted in recent years because of the emergence of shale gas supplies, which are centered onshore in the U.S.

As of August 2, the Colorado State University (CSU) hurricane forecast team has reduced its estimate of nine hurricanes to eight, and four major storms to three for the remainder of the 2013 season. According to the CSU analysts, the Atlantic tropical water has cooled from original predictions in the eastern Atlantic and the chances of an El Nino event are very small. Each of those conditions points to some reduction in original activity forecasts.

Let’s see what August and September bring!

Visit this link to download the full Natural Gas Market Indicators report. Topics covered in this week’s report include: Reported Prices, Weather, Working Gas in Underground Storage, Natural Gas Production, Shale Gas, Rig Counts, Pipeline Imports and Exports, and LNG Markets.

Please direct questions and comments to Chris McGill at cmcgill@aga.org or Richard Meyer at rmeyer@aga.org.

Posted in environment, Natural Gas, people, science, weather | Comments Off

Christina Nyquist What’s New in the Redesigned American Gas Magazine?

AGFeb13Coverenews What’s New in the Redesigned American Gas Magazine?When subscribers of American Gas magazine receive their February edition, they’ll notice a few changes.

In keeping with its tradition of innovation and industry expertise, the American Gas Association (AGA) has redesigned its monthly trade publication to bring readers even more of the best news and information on natural gas utilities and the role they are playing in America’s energy future.

New magazine content will explore the business of gas – how everything from commodity markets to regulations affects the bottom line. Coverage will also include updates about AGA’s advocacy efforts on behalf of its members, along with profiles of emerging voices within the natural gas industry.

America’s natural gas utilities touch almost every segment of their customers’ lives.  In turn they become a crucial part of the nation’s economic recovery, environmental health and national security. American Gas examines both the technical and regulatory systems and processes that ensure the continued safe and reliable delivery of natural gas, as well as the broader benefits the industry brings to society. Check out February’s edition for in-depth coverage of all of these issues and more.

Join the energy conversation today. Subscribe to American Gas here.

Posted in energy, Natural Gas, people, safety, science, technology, utility, vehicles | 1 Comment

Dan Gibson An M.I.T. Plan for Natural Gas With Planet in Mind

Andrew Revkin over at the Times blog Dot Earth has a great story titled “An M.I.T. Plan for Natural Gas With Planet in Mind.” In the story he takes a look at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology new release “The Future of Natural Gas.” A couple snippets from the article that caught my eye:

M.I.T. team’s conclusion on hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”: The environmental impacts of shale development are challenging but manageable. Research and regulation, both state and federal, are needed to minimize the environmental consequences.

On gas to provide a flexible source of “fill in” power to complement expanded use of variable wind power: Furthermore, additional gas-fired capacity will be needed as backup if variable and intermittent renewables, especially wind, are introduced on a large scale. Policy and regulatory steps are needed to facilitate adequate capacity investment for system reliability and efficiency. These increasingly important roles for natural gas in the electricity sector call for a detailed analysis of the interdependencies of the natural gas and power generation infrastructures.

Be sure to take a trip over to read the full article.

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